Radical (Re)naming through a Tapestry of Autoethnographic Voices

Healing through Dis/ability Theorizing

  • Kelly P Vaughan Purdue University Northwest
  • David Hernandez-Saca University of Northern Iowa
  • Jamie Buffington-Adams Indiana University East
  • Mercedes A. Cannon Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
  • Sandra Vanderbilt George Washington University
  • Ann G. Winfield Roger Williams University
Keywords: dis/ability, auto ethnography, ableism

Abstract

In this article, we engaged in a multi-layered collective autoethnography about dis/ability, ableism, and identity within the context of schools and society by exploring the relationship between Curriculum Studies and Disability Studies in Education. While excerpts of our individual narratives are embedded in the article, our final piece weaves together our individual reflections to illustrate that there is no single experience of dis/ability; however, there are themes about dis/ability and resistance to ableism that can be gleaned from hearing a multiplicity of voices within a context of intersectionality for radical individual, social and (inter)disciplinary transformation. 

Author Biographies

Kelly P Vaughan, Purdue University Northwest

Kelly Vaughan is an Assistant Professor of English Education at Purdue Northwest. Her research interests include Curriculum Studies, Curriculum History, and Disability Studies in Education. 

David Hernandez-Saca, University of Northern Iowa

David I. Hernández-Saca is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education in the College of Education at the University of Northern Iowa and the nucleus of his research agenda is problematizing the common sense assumptions of what learning disabilities are.

Jamie Buffington-Adams, Indiana University East

Jamie Buffington-Adams is an Associate Professor and Associate Dean of the School of Education at Indiana University East.

Mercedes A. Cannon, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis

Mercedes A. Cannon serves as the Associate Director in the Office of Adaptive Educational Services of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). She also holds an appointment as a Associate Faculty member (Adjunct) in the School of Education at IUPUI.

Sandra Vanderbilt, George Washington University

Sandra Vanderbilt is a community-based researcher. She is a recent graduate from the Doctoral program in Curriculum and Instruction at George Washington University. Sandra is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Research Methods in the Graduate School of Education and Human Development at George Washington University

Ann G. Winfield, Roger Williams University

Ann G. Winfield is a Professor of Educational Foundations at Roger Williams University.

Published
2019-05-16
Section
Theoretical Analyses