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Author Guidelines

GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS

1ARTICLES

Referees: The International Journal of Education through Art is a refereed journal. Referees are chosen for their expertise within the subject area. They are asked to comment on comprehensibility, originality and scholarly worth of the article submitted

Title: The recommended length of a title is no more than 12 words

Length: Articles should be between 4,500 and 6,000 words and ideally around 5,600 words in length (excluding references and abstract).

Submitting Articles/visual texts should be original and not be under consideration by any other publication. Articles should be submitted online.

Language The journal uses standard British English. The editor reserves the right to alter usage to this end. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of the readership, jargon should be kept to a minimum. Whereas articles may submitted for review in Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Greek and Japanese, translation into English will be the responsibility of authors should they be accepted for publication.

Format The journal is set with Apple Macintosh equipment and reset using Quark; it is therefore best if the use of automatic footnoting devices is avoided.

Visual Materials: IMPORTANT Illustrations to articles, which assist discussion of artworks, learning activities and/or environments are very welcome. Illustrations may be submitted in colour. From volume 8 onwards, the Journal is published online and therefore full colour will be available (hard copy will feature colour and greyscale).

Please do not send original slides, photographs or other artworks.

NOTE If the article contains illustrations, please include (embed)  them in LOW RESOLUTION format in the Word file, but separate HIGH RESOLUTION files will be required if the article is accepted for publication.  If articles are selected for publication contributors will be asked to provide images to the Editor in JPEG or Tiff format (300dpi, min 4 x 6 inches)

Figure numbers should be used as titles using the 'supplementary files' option during the submission process [if high resolution files are contained in the Word file, the file may be rejected by the system].

Captions All visual materials should be accompanied by a caption, which should include the Fig. No., and the acknowledgement to the holder of the copyright.

Copyright Copyright clearance should be indicated and is always the responsibility of the contributor. The source has to be indicated beneath the text. When they are on a separate sheet or file, indication must be given as to where they should be placed in the text. The author has responsibility to ensure that the proper permissions/model for visual image releases are obtained.

Quotations Paragraph quotations must be indented with an additional one-line space above and below and without quotes.

Other Styles Margins should be at least one inch all round and pagination should be continuous. Foreign words and sentences inserted in the text should be italicised.

Author note [to be submitted in the metadata section] A note on each author is required and this should include an institutional postal address and email address. This should not exceed 80 words and must not be contained in the article, use the metadata section.  Authors should also indicate how they wish their names to appear.

Keywords [to be submitted in the metadata indexing section] No less than three and up to six keywords, or two-word phrases, that are core to what is being discussed need to be included at the beginning of articles.

Abstract [to be submitted in the metadata section] Each article should be accompanied by an abstract, which should be no less than 75 words and not exceed 150 words in length. Authors must submit a second abstract in a first language other than English where appropriate.

Please do not include references in the abstract

 

Note: the Journal welcomes personal essays, but these should also include an abstract in the form of a short, clear concise summary of the topic under discussion.

Notes

Notes will appear at the side of appropriate pages, but the numerical sequence runs throughout the article. These should be kept as short as possible and to a minimum, and be identified by a superscript numeral. Please avoid the use of automatic footnoting programmes; simply append the footnotes to the end of the article.

References

References should be kept to a practical minimum. We prefer a version of the use of author - date (Harvard) style references embedded in the main text in the following format (Harper 1999: 27), and a single reference at the end of the article rather than giving bibliographical references as side notes. Here are some examples of the most likely forms:

Dewulf, S. and Baillie, C. (1999), CASE: How to foster creativity, London, Department for Education and Employment, London

Downing, D. and Watson, R. (2004), School art: What's in it? Exploring visual arts in secondary schools, Slough. National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER).

Education Scotland (2013), Creativity across learning 3-18, Edinburgh, Education Scotland, https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/cre39-impact-report.pdf Accessed 26 April 2017.

Paek, K-M. (2016), ‘Challenging journeys: Contemporary Korean artists and some possible implications for Education through art’, International Journal of Education through Art, 12.3, pp. 291- 309, doi: 10.1386/eta.12.3.291_1

Robinson, K. (2001), Out of our minds: Learning to be creative, Oxford: Capstone.

Žižek, Slavoj (1999), The Ticklish Subject: The Absent Centre of Political Ontology, London: Verso. 

________ (2006a), How to Read Lacan, London: Granta Books. 

________ (2006b), Interrogating the Real, New York: Continuum. 

NOTE: for detailed guidelines on the Intellect house style, including bibliographic referencing, please refer to the publisher’s guidelines, available at: https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/page/index,name=journalstyleguide/

Website references:

It is crucial to treat websites as publishers of material and not as authors of the material (except for the occasions where they are the author, of course). Website references are like other references. There is no need to decipher any place of publication or a specific publisher, but the reference must have an author, and the author must be referenced Harvard-style within the text. If it is a website news article with no by-line, the day/month/ year of its initial publication must be given, and the website becomes

the author. If the website is the 'home site' of an organization publishing its own material without a by-line, the organization should appear as the author. Unlike paper references, however, web pages can change, so there needs to be a date of access as well as the full web reference. In the list of references at the end of your article, the item should read something like this:

Cabrera, D. (2000), 'Les idées sont vivantes et la vie est politique',

http://www.peripheries.net/g-cabr.html. Accessed 14 December 2000.

A reference list is essential.

2VISUAL ESSAYS

[Image/Text-Based Submissions]

The TOTAL word limit for a Visual Essay is 1,000 words. Visual Essays should be a minimum of 2 pages and a maximum of 10 pages. What is more important than length is the quality of the interaction of image and text to deliver meaning.

What IS a Visual Essay?

We offer these comments as guidance, there are many ways to make a visual essay and we would encourage you to discuss your proposal with the Editor before you submit.

Visual essays or image/text-based submissions, should integrate image and text in a creative way to document, evaluate or reflect on art-based learning activities, events or outcomes. Think of it as an exploration of a topic that conveys ideas and meaning through visual means as well as language. It is important to note that we view visual essays as equal in academic status to traditional text-based articles. Images should not simply illustrate the text or exhibit the authors or students' artistic productions as in a gallery but should constitute an essential component in the articulation of meaning.

Proposals for visual essays should include a critical introduction (or an abstract) which should be no less than 75 words and not exceed 150 words in length outlining to the editorial team why the work submitted is relevant to the theme of art education. This proposal should also be accompanied with the images according to the relevant guidelines stated in this document. If the feature is selected for publication the editorial team will be seeking your input on the design of the feature and the critical introduction will normally become the 'abstract'.  The total word limit for image/text features is 1,000 words.

The submission may:

●      Be entirely visual.

●      Include image and text working together to tell the story, with predominance of images over text.

●      Include images originating from a range of sources, for example, an image collection that is already available such as a curated collection or an image archive. Images that have been produced specially or the essay; images collected as research data; images collected to report and document an artistic process or event or images selected or produced to reflect on a particular aspect of art education.

What is NOT a Visual Essay?

  • Lecture notes
  • PowerPoint presentations
  • Exhibition notes, reviews or catalogues
  • Images of the author's artwork or sketchbooks
  • An essay with illustrations

If the feature is selected for publication the editorial team will be seeking your input on the design of the feature. The total word limit for image/text features is 1,000 words. Visual Essays should be a minimum of 2 pages and a maximum of 10 pages.

Authors might refer to examples previously published in the journal.

Copyright Copyright clearance should be indicated and is always the responsibility of the contributor. The source has to be indicated beneath the text. When they are on a separate sheet or file, indication must be given as to where they should be placed in the text. The author has responsibility to ensure that the proper permissions/model for visual image releases are obtained.

Submission

Authors should submit the following:

  • Critical introduction (no more than 150 words)
  • 4 to 6 Keywords
  • Full postal and email contact details of authors
  • Visual Essay (image and text integrated – 1,000 words max)

 

Visual Essays should be submitted first as a DOC file, or an editable pdf file.  At the submission stage, authors should integrate the images in the file at low resolution; if accepted for publication, editors will require high-resolution images and will work with authors on the layout of the Visual Essay. Contributors will be asked to provide images to the Editor in Tiff format (300 dpi, 145mm/ 1740 pixel width). 

Copy Editing and Layout

If the Visual Essay is accepted for publication, authors will be required to supply separate text files and high-resolution images. Images should be of the highest possible quality, jpeg or tiff files at 300 dpi.  The authors should suggest the layout of the Visual Essay and work with the editors and journal graphic designers.  Original artwork should be scanned at actual size and 300dpi.

 

Opinion
The views expressed in the Journal are those of the authors, and do not necessarily coincide with those of the Editor, Executive or the Editorial Board.

For further information or any questions, please contact:

 

Rita Irwin:  ijetaed1@gmail.com (articles)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. Originality

    The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in 'Comments to the Editor').

  2. Blind Review

    The instructions in Ensuring a Blind Review have been followed.

  3. Stylistic and Bibliographic Requirements

    The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines, which are found in About the Journal.

    • Format

    The submission file is in Microsoft Word document file format and is of a reasonable size [ie no more than 3MB].

    • Abstract [to be submitted in the metadata section]
      Each article should be accompanied by an abstract, which should be no less than 75 words and not exceed 150 words in length. Authors should submit a second abstract in a first language other than English where appropriate.
    • Spacing

    The text is double-spaced; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.

    • Images

    Images should be embedded in the text at low resolution. If the article is accepted, authors will be required to supply separate, numbered, high quality (300dpi TIFF or Jpeg) files with a list of figure numbers and captions.

    • References

    We use author - date (Harvard) style references embedded in the main text in the following format (Harper 1999: 27), and a single reference list at the end of the article rather than giving bibliographical references as side notes. Where available, URLs for the references and dates of access have been provided.  Translations of non-English titles in the references have been provided.

     

    Here are some examples of the most likely forms for references:

    Dewulf, S. and Baillie, C. (1999), CASE: How to Foster Creativity London: Department for Education and Employment.

    Downing, D. and Watson, R. (2004), School art: What's in it? Exploring visual arts in secondary schools Slough: National Foundation ofr Educational Research (NFER).

    HMIE (2006). Emerging Good Practice in Promoting Creativity: A report by HMIE. http://www.hmie.gov.uk/documents/publication/hmieegpipc.html

    Accessed 19 June 2011.

    Jackson, N. (2006), Creativity in History Teaching and Learning. London: Higher Education Academy.

    LTS. (2006), 'Creativity in Education: Learning to think in new ways', http://www.ltscotland.org.uk/creativity/ Accessed 4 September 2008.

    Robinson, K. (2001), Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative, Oxford: Capstone.

     

     

     

  4.  

    Copyright Clearance

    The authors must assure the publishers that procedures and requirements for copyright clearance have followed and agree to the publisher’s license. If the paper is accepted, I understand that I will be required to submit a copyright clearance form. To submit the license with your contribution, download a consent form by clicking here.

  5. AUTHOR NOTE

    This must not exceed 80 words.

    A note on each author is required and this should include details of

    • Current position
    • Institution and full postal address (we cannot publish personal addresses)
    • Institutional Email address (we cannot publish personal addresses)

     

 

Copyright Notice

Copyright Notice

The International Journal of Education Through Art requires authors to complete a copyright consent form before work can be published.  You can download a consent agreement form by clicking here.  The form may be submitted with your contribution, but MUST be completed if your work is accepted for publication.

 

 

 

Privacy Statement

The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.