A CORRELATIONAL STUDY BETWEEN ORGANIC MATTER CONTENT IN SOIL AND STREAM WATER pH OF SALMON-ASSOCIATED STREAMS IN PACIFIC SPIRIT REGIONAL PARK

  • Serene Chang
  • Jasleen Dhaliwal
  • Jane Wanjiru
  • Phoebe Wu

Abstract

Due to the rapid decline of salmon populations, we turn our focus to the habitability of streams. Looking into three streams that are either salmon-residing, non-residing, or under restoration. We study the relationship between organic matter in soil and stream pH, two abiotic factors that influence the ecosystem and salmon survival. Using a pH meter on site and a 3% hydrogen peroxide test to measure organic matter content in dehydrated soil samples, we collected data from Musqueam (M), Canyon (C), and Spanish Banks (S) Creeks respectively. The results show that there are no significant differences between the mean pH (M: 6.21 ± 0.058, C: 6.16 ± 0.123, S: 6.27 ± 0.059) and mean organic matter content (M: 3.99% ± 1.119, C: 3.01% ± 0.095, S: 3.03% ± 0.199) across the streams, and no statistically significant correlational relationship (r = - 0.06246) can be extracted. We conclude that the two variables are consistent across the three streams and that there is no apparent relationship between soil organic matter and pH. This suggests that the stream habitability for salmon fall within similar range in terms of pH and organic matter across the three distinct streams.

Published
2019-02-26
Section
Articles