Collaboration and crowdsourcing: the future of LAM convergence

Nicole Askin

Abstract


This article discusses the possibility of convergence between libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions to facilitate both institutional efficiency and increased user engagement. It motivates this possibility by exploring a brief history of the LAM field and the current challenges facing cultural institutions. Finally, it proposes the development of an integrated research environment that makes use of collaborative technologies to allow users to contribute to the formation and study of cultural heritage.



Keywords


GLAM; cultural heritage; user engagement; collaboration

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References


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