Congenital absence of inferior vena cava in a 33-year-old with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: a case report

  • Jesse Tuomas Ronald Spooner University of British Columbia
  • Manjot Birk University of British Columbia Island Medical Program
  • Nadra Ginting University of British Columbia Island Medical Program. Division of Vascular Surgery

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Background: Agenesis of the inferior vena cava (AIVC) is a rare disorder that, when combined with co-morbid hypercoagulable disease such as anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (APAS), increases the risk of chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We report a 33-year-old female with a past medical history of recurrent DVTs and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APAS) who at the age of 33, was incidentally found to have AIVC while assessing clot burden, which likely contributed to her recurrent DVT episodes earlier in life.

Management:  The combination of AIVC and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is rare and can lead to recurrent DVTs in young patients. Prolonged anti-coagulation is the preferred treatment in addition to elastic compression stockings, modification of risk factors and treatment of further complications.

In this paper we provide a case discussion and up to date information on diagnosis and management of a patient with both AIVC and APAS.

Author Biography

Nadra Ginting, University of British Columbia Island Medical Program. Division of Vascular Surgery

Vascular Surgeon. Project Supervisor. UBC Faculty of Medicine, Victoria, BC. 

Published
2020-08-24
Section
Case and Elective Reports