Health Professional Student Journal https://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/hpsj <p><code class="Dots3"></code><span style="font-size: medium;"><br style="font-size: medium;" /></span><code class="Blue"></code></p> en-US Health Professional Student Journal 2368-8645 <p>Authors who publish with this journal agree to the following terms:</p><p>Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/" target="_new">Creative Commons Attribution License</a> that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.</p><p>Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.</p><p>Authors are permitted and encouraged to post their work online (e.g., in institutional repositories or on their website) prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work (See <a href="http://opcit.eprints.org/oacitation-biblio.html" target="_new">The Effect of Open Access</a>).</p> Anosognosia and rehabilitation: Definitions, practice implications, and directions for future research https://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/hpsj/article/view/187808 <p><strong>Abstract </strong></p><p>Anosognosia, the unawareness of impairment, affects a broad range of clinical populations.  Patients presenting with anosognosia deny their deficits and may not see the merits of participating in rehabilitation. This review paper, written by two Master of Occupational Therapy students, explores pertinent research on the concept of anosognosia and its potential relationship to rehabilitation outcomes, as well as discusses some of the clinical implications in treating individuals with anosognosia. The information in this article will be relevant to any disciplines working with people with decreased insight, particularly in a rehab setting. </p> Nicole Matichuk Liv Brekke ##submission.copyrightStatement## 2016-06-21 2016-06-21 1 3 Discharge Planning for a Patient with Multiple Myeloma https://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/hpsj/article/view/187937 <p>Discharge planning, in relation to cancer and chronic pain, is especially important in providing pain relief, education, and support programs that foster meaningful connections; however, the biggest challenge for patients and families as they approach discharge is the establishment of attainable goals due to the uncertainty and ambiguity awaiting them upon returning home (Molassiotis, Wilson, Blair, Howe, &amp; Cavet, 2011; Mor &amp; Besdine, 2011). Consequently, the establishment of community support and achievable goals is essential, especially in the context of cancer care as partners are at greater risk of psychological distress due to competing demands (Molassiotis et al., 2011). Nurses play a central role in coordinating proposed discharge plans and evaluating ongoing responses. They also significantly impact patient discharge goals by identifying barriers, needs, and opportunities for discharge planning, improving communication and congruence in discharge needs, and providing direct patient education; however, they do not work alone, but as part of an interdisciplinary team (Nosbusch et al., 2011; Saint Paul’s Hospital (SPH), 2001). Through proper education and support systems, key factors in adequate discharge planning, stress can be minimized and expectations managed thereby preventing complications and reducing rates of readmission (Jack et al., 2009; Rini et al., 2007). This is clearly exemplified in the following case analysis.</p> Zerlyn Hui Yi Lee ##submission.copyrightStatement## 2016-06-21 2016-06-21 1 3 Community Nursing: A Student Reflection https://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/hpsj/article/view/187935 Pacific Spirit Community Health Center is situated in Vancouver's Community Health Area four, and is a common clinical placement for University of British Columbia nursing students. Combining an insightful analysis on the observed impact nurses have on their breastfeeding clients with a personal reflection of experiences, this reflective article, written from a nursing student's perspective, touches on the importance of the breastfeeding experience in the self-esteem and self-confidence of clients. Zerlyn Hui Yi Lee ##submission.copyrightStatement## 2016-06-21 2016-06-21 1 3 Medical Student Summer Clinical Externship in PM&R: a student’s experience https://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/hpsj/article/view/188353 <p><span style="font-size: large;">Physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&amp;R), also known as physiatry, is a medical specialty that is lesser-known to medical students. One reason that medical students have a lack of knowledge about PM&amp;R may be due to its limited exposure during medical school. The dual purposes of this elective report are to increase student exposure to PM&amp;R and to highlight a clinical training opportunity for medical students. PM&amp;R is a medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurological and musculoskeletal conditions, with a focus on restoring function and quality of life. The Medical Student Summer Clinical Externship (MSSCE) is a program offered by the Association of Academic Physiatrists for medical students with a strong desire to work with patients in the field of PM&amp;R. I took part in the MSSCE at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in the summer of 2014. Participating in this program and gaining clinical exposure to PM&amp;R was an important and valuable stepping-stone for me, and I would highly recommend the MSSCE to medical students who are interested in the field of PM&amp;R.</span></p> Alvin H. Ip ##submission.copyrightStatement## 2016-06-21 2016-06-21 1 3 Exploring the relationship between health and activities: Implications for subjective experiences https://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/hpsj/article/view/188356 <p><strong>Background.</strong> Recent research demonstrated the positive effects of lifestyle factors on telomere health. These studies typically focus on activities such as diet, exercise, and meditation and their influence on telomere length. However, there is a lack of studies on other types of activities. <strong>Purpose</strong><strong>.</strong> Through the Health and Retirement Study, social and creative activities were analyzed to explore their associations with overall health. <strong>Method</strong><strong>.</strong> Secondary, cross-sectional regression analyses were conducted, examining the associations between social and creative activities with 2 measures of health: self-rated health and telomere length. <strong>Findings.</strong> Decreased frequency of writing was associated with longer (healthier) telomere lengths, and mixed findings were found for the relationship between activities and self-reported health. <strong>Implications</strong><strong>.</strong> Various factors were discussed regarding the unexpected and inconsistent results. Most notably, this analysis calls for future studies to use participants’ subjective experiences of activity engagement to study its health benefits.</p> Flora Miles ##submission.copyrightStatement## 2016-06-21 2016-06-21 1 3